CTV Ad Summit - leaderboard - 4-27-20

Analysis for 'Jun Group'

  • Perspective What's this? It Takes More than Viewability Standards to Get Views

    Video viewability is broken - but not for the reasons you think. The way the industry measures viewability does not reflect actual human behavior, and it fails to meet advertisers' real need, which is making sure people actually see their ads. While ad-tech and viewability vendors, publishers, and agencies negotiate what should be considered "viewable" (pixels and time spent on-screen, etc.), actual people are moving on to mobile devices.

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  • CTV Ad Summit - full banner - 4-27-20
  • Research: Mobile Video Ads Getting Longer, More Engaging

    Jun Group, the incentivized video ad provider, has shared a new infographic with a few interesting nuggets of data, indicating, among other things, that mobile video ads are getting longer and are also more engaging than video ads delivered online. Based on 10.2 million mobile and online video views in Q1 and Q2 2013, Jun Group found that 54% of mobile ads are now 30 seconds, 10% are 60 seconds and a surprising 32% are 90 seconds (personally I'm glad I haven't experienced one of these yet).

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  • Penthera Webinar full banner - 7-3-20
  • Study: Incentivized Video Ads Drive 2 Times Higher Interaction Than Pre-Rolls

    A new study released by Jun Group, an opt-in video ad platform, has found that users are twice as likely to interact with a brand upon watching an incentivized video ad as they are after watching a pre-roll. The results are based on 7.7 million incentivized video ad views from Jun Group campaigns between May-August 2012 along with industry data on pre-rolls.

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  • Penthera Webinar full banner - 7-3-20
  • Claussen Pickles Is Latest Brand to Use Incentivized Video Views

    Claussen Pickles, which is part of the Kraft Foods family, is the latest brand to successfully use incentivized video views in social games. For those not familiar with the concept (which I wrote about last April), those playing social games on sites like Facebook and others are offered the opportunity to earn virtual currency in exchange for watching a brand's video and/or engaging with it in a particular way (e.g. sharing, liking, etc.). The brand gets an uncluttered experience delivered to a highly-targeted audience.

    Mitchell Reichgut, CEO of Jun Group, whose firm partnered with ad agency The Escape Pod, to execute the Claussen campaign, shared the 1-minute video that was created, called "Journey to the Claussen Pickles" (see video below). The offbeat video highlights the idea that Claussen pickles are found in the refrigerated section of the grocery store, and though they require extra effort to find, are worth it.

    Mitchell said that video is targeted to moms playing social games on sites like Facebook. The completion rate is 75-80%, driven be the need to finish viewing in order to earn the reward. Of those that complete viewing, approximately 10% "Like" Claussen on Facebook, which means the brand now has a direct communications channel to send future offers and news.

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  • CTV Ad Summit - full banner - 4-27-20
  • Jun Group Pioneers "Incentivized" Video Ad Views In Social Games

    As a non-gamer, I've been fascinated, from a distance, by the whole "virtual currency" and "virtual goods" models that millions of gamers are so passionate about. Now it turns out there's a way of marrying gamers' pursuit of virtual currency with driving opt-in video views for major brands' online video ads. Jun Group, a social video company, has been a pioneer in this emerging space, and last week its CEO Mitchell Reichgut gave me a primer on how the model works, and why it's being adopted. Jun Group is also issuing an update on its progress today.

    First, for those not familiar with virtual currency, it is used to purchase specific virtual goods which enhance the experience in online games, social networks and virtual worlds. Typically there are many different ways to earn virtual currency within any particular environment, including paying for it with actual cash (yes, buying "virtual" currency with "actual" currency - it's all part of the gaming experience!), all of which adds up to a reported $2 billion per year industry.

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  • CTV Ad Summit - full banner - 4-27-20
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